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”Thunder Bottle” or the Spout Barometer

”Thunder Bottle” or the Spout Barometer

It’s sometimes called ”The oldest barometer known to man” - and it very well could be. How old this genial invention actually is, no one knows for sure.What we do know is that the Moors had the spout barometer with them when they occupied Spain in the year 711 and founded their Caliphate of Cordoba. What we do know is that the Moors had the spout barometer with them when they occupied Spain in the year 711 and founded their Caliphate of Cordoba.

But then of course the Moors were the most scientifically advanced people of their time, while the darkness and ignorance of the middle ages started to envelop Europe.

It was not until 1643 that we got more exact functioning barometer. This was the year in which Torricelli, Galileo Galileis’ gifted pupil invented what we know today as the mercury barometer. And to tell the truth, his first barometers were not much better than the Moors’ ancient “thunder bottle”

a name by which the spout barometer is also known. Torricelli’s principle was the same as their’s - ambient atmospheric pressure acts on the surface of a fluid, causing the level of the fluid to rise or fall in the step with the changes in atmospheric pressure.

Like the names of so many other scientific instruments, barometer is from Greek: “Baros” meaning weight, and “Metron” meaning measurement.

The spout barometer is actually as reliable and accurate as it is old. That is to say, if you are mostly interested in what the weather have in store and are not expecting barometric readings of a scientific value. And it’s a very original and interesting topic of conversation for any home.

This decorative, old instrument had not been manufactured for a considerable time, until the skilled glassworkers Bert Jonsson and Jan Engström found a completely new way of  manufacturing the barometer. This completely unique and handcrafted barometer has recently been protected by it’s origin and pattern.

 

This is how it works

 

Water is filled through the spout when the atmospheric pressure is normal. The water level must cover the inlet hole between the spout and the bottle. The barometer can now be hung up in a suitable place.

The ambient atmospheric pressure will now act on the surface of the water, causing it to rise in the bottle and fall in the spout when the weather is approaching; falling in the bottle to rise in the spout when inclement weather is on it’s way. And shouls water drip from the spout, you can expect stormy weather!  Top up with cleat tap water as required to maintain the original amount.

 

The Spout barometer is handcrafted, every sample is a unique piece of art.

 

 

 

Produced here

 

More information

 

Click here

 

 

Rosdala Glasfactory AB

 

Tel: 0474-40193

 

rosdala@telia.com

 

Tel: + 46 (0)8-6583474

      +46 (0)525-21483

+46 (0)706-343762

Tel: +46 (0)705-456615

 

Bert.jonsson@mjtech.se

info@mjtech.se

Low pressure        Normal pressure        High pressure

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